Donor Story

Marge to Move On

Tamarind Institute’s Board Honors Departing Director

By Anna Adams

Posted December 15, 2015

Marjorie (Marge) Devon, director of UNM’s Tamarind Institute since 1985, will retire in January 2016. In honor of her long tenure, the members of the Tamarind National Advisory Board have committed to funding a scholarship for a student studying lithography at Tamarind.

Tamarind National Advisory Board members enjoy a tour of the Belger Arts Center in Kansas City last fall. Marjorie Devon appears in the front row, second from left.

Tamarind National Advisory Board members enjoy a tour of the Belger Arts Center in Kansas City last fall. Marjorie Devon appears in the front row, second from left.

“The scholarship is a well-deserved tribute to all that Marge has done,” said Ron Stovitz, a board member from San Francisco. “All of us have seen her passion firsthand from working with her.”

The Marjorie L. Devon Scholarship will allow a student to enroll in Tamarind’s one-year Printer Training Program. The program accepts eight students per year, about half of whom are international students who come to Albuquerque to perfect their skills in collaborative lithography. One of Tamarind’s goals is to attract international students who will return home afterward and start lithography workshops in their region of the world.

“The Tamarind Institute gives UNM a further international dimension,” said Stovitz. “It sets a worldwide standard in lithography.”

Since its founding in 1960, Tamarind has focused on two primary goals: training master printers and offering opportunities for contemporary artists to work in this unique medium. Tamarind artists are invited for two-week residencies, during which time they collaborate with students and master printers to create original, limited-edition prints.

“Artists get the opportunity to create original lithographs,” said Stovitz. “Prints are more affordable than, say, oil paintings, but they’re still valuable because they are created in limited editions.” The artist approves and signs each print, and the stone on which the image is drawn, used to create the prints, is defaced once the edition is complete.

“It’s dramatic to see students exposed to this unparalleled experience—the synergy between the master printer, student and artist,” said Stovitz. “These students do not have the prospect of a high-salary job awaiting them, but they’re all passionate people. Funding and support is critical to these students’ success. Marge has been tireless in seeking funding.”

After 40 years on Cornell Drive, Devon championed Tamarind’s capital campaign, raising $4.9 million to renovate the Architecture and Planning Annex at 2500 Central Ave. The ribbon-cutting took place in 2010, coinciding with Tamarind’s 50th anniversary, and put Tamarind in a location to attract more visitors.

“In the future, we hope to continue to thrive and attract more people,” said Stovitz. “We want Tamarind to continue to set a worldwide standard in lithography, and to do so, Tamarind’s Printer Training Program must remain strong.”

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You can support the Marjorie L. Devon Scholarship here.